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Associate Degree

Bachelor Degree

Master’s Degree

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Theory

and

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Knowledege / Practice

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Theory, Knowledge,

and Application

Doctorate

Doctor of Theology

The Doctor of Theology degree is essential for individuals who have already made marks in ministry and desire to conduct scientific inquiry into theology. While this is a professional degree, it has extensive academic content because of the need to circumscribe virtually all areas of knowledge in God. Hebrew-American Studies constitute our flagship offering. Therefore, the doctor of theology degree is a combination of academic and professional study albeit with a sharp focus on everything God.

 

A holder of the doctor of theology degree should be able to decipher materials that have denominational undertones. The student will be exposed to all available paradigms in church operation. The spirituality content of this degree stands in the center of the academic and professional intersection. Program credits and durations are the same across the doctoral program platforms. Research requirements are also the same as in the other doctoral programs.

The difference will reside in whatever makes the difference between Theology, Ministry, and Biblical Research. Students have 50 credits to achieve. These credits will come from 24 months of coursework and 12 months of intensive scholarly inquiry completion, to wit, a dissertation.

 

The initial aspects of the doctoral dissertation will commence upon enrollment and run side by side with coursework. By so doing, the student has the opportunity to incorporate lessons learned along the way in the research. The final dissertation should be no less than dissertations from major institutions across the globe. The overall duration of this program will depend on the student’s due diligence and logistical intersection with the schedules of dissertation committee members.

 

This institution will constitute a dissertation committee for the student, and the student will work with committee through the direct guidance of the research supervisor and in line with this institution’s dissertation guidelines. The specifics of the research activity and the dissertation document will follow stipulations in a separate document to whom it may concern. Furthermore, the dissertation must be relevant to one or more areas in spirituality, religiosity, churchiology, ecumenism, etc. Every step of the dissertation initiation up to the completion must pass through university approval from the Office of Academic Research.

 

Students will route all approval request through faculty members serving as their research supervisors. Students must receive approvals for their topics before they may commence with writing their proposals. Students must defend their proposals, and if the proposals have merit, the university will give the necessary approvals for the students to commence the study proper. Students will defend their final dissertation before faculty and other audience. Students who complete this program must attend the solemn assembly and participate in the commencement ceremonies.

 

 

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Doctor of Ministry

 

The program in Doctor of Ministry involves a demonstration of the mastery of the terrain of ministering. The doctor of ministry must show excellence in thoughts and deeds regarding the discharge of ministry obligations. Hebrew-American Studies constitute our flagship offering. Enrollees in this program are expectedly already ministering at high levels or organized churching. Enrollees must come with their preconceived notions and be prepared to strengthen such notions or adjust them based on the content of the Holy Bible. Program credits and durations are the same across the doctoral program platforms. Research requirements are also the same as in the other doctoral programs. The difference will reside in whatever makes the difference between Theology, Ministry, and Biblical Research. Students have 40 credits to achieve. These credits will come from 24 months of coursework and 12 months of intensive scholarly inquiry completion, to wit, a dissertation.

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Doctor of Biblical Research

 

The degree of Doctor of Biblical Research is essentially a demonstration of scholarship. The student must cover 60 semester credits that can be broken down to quarters. Note that Hebrew-American Studies constitute our flagship offering. The difference between this degree and secular doctorate degrees lies in this program’s complete dependence on the Holy Bible for content and ethics. Research methodology is universal and will run its full course in this and other doctorate degree programs, no matter a student’s doctoral specialization.

 

The doctor of biblical research is essentially the same as the doctor of philosophy except that the doctor of biblical research lives and breathes the Holy Bible. Upon graduation, the doctor of biblical research can find any information or resource on any spiritual, religious, ethical, moral, and philosophical topic. Graduates will be able to stand their ground in any educational institution anywhere in the world requiring academic and educational excellence.

In other words, a student of this degree program must be personally qualified, strong, astute, and prepared academically, socially, professionally, technically, and educationally to pass through this program. Other scholars all over the world will gladly take on the graduate of this program hoping to have a field day. Therefore, a graduate of doctor of biblical research must be a no-nonsense scholar. The graduate must be able to teach religion, reading, research, speaking, ethics, morality, and writing. Other subject areas include the advanced levels of the courses available at the master’s degree program courses pool. Program credits and durations are the same across the doctoral program platforms. Research requirements are also the same as in the other doctoral programs. The difference will reside in whatever makes the difference between Theology, Ministry, and Biblical Research. Students have 40 credits to achieve. These credits will come from 24 months of coursework and 12 months of intensive scholarly inquiry completion, to wit, a dissertation.

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Doctorate Degree General Course Pool

 

Biblical Customs and Traditions:

This course covers customs and traditions the people of God observed as documented between Genesis and Malachi. Students will learn the similarities and dissimilarities between customs of the Biblical times and the Common Era in modern societies. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

First, Second, and Third World Anti-Semitism:

This course covers focuses on the three seasons of hate suffered by the Semitic people Critical components of the course are (a) the theory of the migration of Shem’s bloodline (b) the travails of Shem’s offspring, (c) the specific acts of violence and violation perpetrated on Shem’s bloodline, and (d) the pro-Shem activism and push-back on the hate actions against Shemites. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Biblical Landmarks and Shemites:

This course covers the geographies of Shemite odyssey. Students will learn the who, what, when, where, and how of Shem and his descendants.

Influence of the American Church:

This course covers the power American style evangelism exerts on Christians world over. Prominent names and churches in the United States will serve as examples of church journeys from 1776 AD to the present. Students will learn the similarities and dissimilarities in liturgy – American on the one hand, and other cultures on the other hand. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Biblical Versus Human Verbiage:

This course covers common expressions that are popular in the Holy Bible and those manifesting in the secular human conversations. Students will become circumspect in the use of words within and outside sacred and secular environments and atmospheres. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Govern-mentation and God-mentation:

This course covers systems thinking with a focus on the parallel paradigms of human political process and Theocratic considerations in forging the polity. Students will become aware of existing systems and comprehend the delineation of the two parallel systems to be able to create appropriate systems within the ministries or organizations they find themselves.

Church Doctrines and Church Members:

This course covers doctrinal foundations of different churches and the disposition or indisposition of members of such churches. Students will learn why members would leave a church for doctrinal reasons and others stay with the church for without resenting the doctrines.

Membership Orientation Through Sermonology:

This course covers the use of sermons from the pulpit to ground audiences into becoming committed members of the church. Students will learn that kingdom-minded preachers have deemed short membership orientations insufficient to elicit long-term loyalty, and that the sermons meant for preaching salvation and eternal life are being used to win the hearts of attendees for the ‘kingdom’ belonging to pastors (on earth) rather than win the souls for the kingdom belonging to Christ (in eternity). Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Jewish Igbo Extraction 1600BC to 2018 BC:

This course covers the disconnected Jewish society in diaspora, revealing the countries of their exiles as well as their post-exodus ethnographic habitat. Students will learn who constituted the extraction and the continuum of their ethnography.

Applicability of OT and NT Genealogy:

This course covers the sequencing (a) the genealogy of man from creation down to Noah’s children, (b) the genealogy of Christ, and (c) applying them to contemporary human generations. Students will learn where they fit as human generations and be able to convey the knowledge. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Paul of Tarsus Versus Yeshua Hamashiach:

This course covers specific comments and teachings in which Paul of Tarsus appeared to be at variance with Yeshua Hamashiach. Students will compare texts to evaluate any noticeable variances.

God-mentality Representations in the Bible:

This course covers incidences of the recognition of God in the activities of men. Students will learn about people and situations in which the mentality of God-First undergirded human actions.

Paul of Tarsus Versus Simon Peter:

This course covers the personalities of Paul and Peter, highlighting their interactions and how the church appropriated relevance to each of them in the 1st Century and in the 21st Century. Students will learn the about church alignments to either Paul or Peter.

Theology and Natural Sciences:

This course covers the Theology’s perception of natural sciences and natural science’s perceptions of Theology as religious texts and science texts reveal. Students will become aware of divergences that might exist and how to scripturally and spiritually manage those divergences. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Prophecies, Revelations, and Divinations:

This course covers (a) the messages God gave to the prophets of old, (b) the future happenings God showed to Apostle John in Patmos Island, and (c) the activities of the Witch of Endor and other diviners. Students will learn to determine the veracity of so-called prophetic massages and to test revelatory reports to avoid relying on diviners.

The Seven Churches of Revelation:

This course covers the churches Apostle John heard about when he was in the Island of Patmos. The content will include (a) actual locations of the churches, (b) timelines and events around the churches, and (c) what became of the churches. Students will become aware of the symptoms of success or failure among churches. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top half of Bloom’s Taxonomy. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

God, Tradition, and the Contemporary:

This course covers an exploration of the Godliness factor in the traditions of the Genesis-to-Malachi people in comparison with the contemporary people of the 21st Century. Students will learn (1) what God demanded of His people, and (2) the effects of contemporary era on supposed worshippers of God.

21st Century Churchiological Antecedents:

This course covers modern-day churcheous (outward) behaviors in church that convey appearances of spirit-controlled atmospheres. Other constituents of the course are body language, verbiage, terminology, and other spontaneous antecedents conveying deep-rooted involvement in the worship service some or all of which might be fake. Students will learn the ramifications of churchiological behaviors with a view to taking a stand for pure worship of God.

Human Versus God’s Celebrations:

This course covers (a) the feasts God commanded and ordained, and (b) the feasts human beings imposed on themselves. Students will streamline these feasts and logically justify or nullify some or all of them. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

The Big Bang Theory:

This course covers the science-laden anti-creationist belief and the Christian perception of the ‘big bang’. Students will become thinkers who can hold meaningful topical conversation and match Christian belief in creationism against the diverse views on how man came to populate the planet earth. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

The Apocalyptic Jurisprudence:

This course covers the judgmental prerogative of God in executing the final destruction of the world. Students will learn the postulations regarding the apocalypse with a view to unravelling the pros and cons of the future event. 

Creationism:

This course covers the belief in creation – the entire Chapters 1 and 2 of the book of Genesis. Discussion of contemporary presentations by diverse schools of thought. Students will learn to rely solely on ONLY what the Bible specifies, which is creationism.

Old Testament:

This course covers a treatment of the backgrounds of all the books of the old testament with a view to eliciting Bible-centered followership rather than discipleship based on the personal guidance of a speaker, apostle, prophet, evangelist, pastor, or teacher. Students will be able understand God through God’s dealings with people of old as an example of how modern humans may perceive their relationships with God of the old testament.

The Great Man Theory:

This course covers the enunciation of the qualities of greatness in an individual that endears the individual to others around him, and using this principle to interpret the person of Jesus Christ in the context of leadership. Students will develop the morale to not only manifest their individual leadership styles, but to also dare to be ‘great’ in the sense of this theory. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Hebrew-Americans:

This course covers (a) the Hebrewic content of the United State, (b) the difference between the Hebrew and the Jew, and (c) what people-grouping constitutes the ‘Hebrew-American’. Students will be able to objectively dissect religious affinities and the antecedent human content within the contiguous United States.

New Testament:
This course covers a treatment of the backgrounds of all the books of the new testament with a view to exploring the thrust of the Gospels, the Acts, and the Epistles. Students will be able identify the effects of these texts on Judeo-Christian believers. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top two quarters of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

International Missions:

This course covers the programs and activities surrounding the delivery of God’s World and knowledge to people of far-flung places such as foreign countries. Students will learn from international missionaries, connect with missions in foreign lands, complete an International Missions Certificate examination, and plan (or execute) an international missions experience with one of the university’s affiliated ministries in foreign lands.

Church Unity and Disunity Factors:

This course covers the principle Christ taught that a kingdom divided against itself will fall. Students will use that teaching to test the contemporary body of Christ (body of believers attending different churches).

Missionary Journey Analytics:

This course covers an analysis of all three missionary journeys of Paul of Tarsus. Each student will become a critical thinker, develop and demonstrate analytical mind, and identify incidents that stand out to him or her. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Leadership Ethics and Morality:

This course covers leadership responsibilities to lead by examples and embody righteousness through compliance with ethical and moral precepts. Students will learn leadership styles, leadership traits, and leadership activities.

The Law and the Prophets:

This course covers spiritual antecedents of the scriptures on the law portion of the Holy Bible and the prophets portion of the Holy Bible. Students will have a thorough understanding of the laws of God and who the major and minor prophets were. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Biblical Literature:

This course covers the language, poetic, literary, and historical domiciliation of Bible stories. Students will become versed in the usage and abusage contained in texts to show the idiosyncrasies, whims, and fancies of central characters in the specific scripts. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Indoctrination in Judiasm:

This course covers (a) the principles adherents of Judaism must embrace and (b) the process by which adherents are grounded for complete loyalty and commitment. Students will learn the principles and simulate the indoctrination processes.

Christian Indoctrination:

This course covers (a) the principles adherents of Christianity must embrace and (b) the process by which adherents are grounded for complete loyalty and commitment, and (c) the methods 21st Century some pastors and Christian teachers use to strengthen the faith of their followers. Students will learn the principles of Christian indoctrination and simulate the indoctrination processes.

Hebrews in America:

This course covers the life, times, timelines, dislocation, relocation, and localization of Hebrews in the contiguous United States. Students will learn the specifics of the shift in culture and geography.

Churchiology and Theology:

This course covers the comprehension and analysis of human churching antics visible in some churches versus the godliness of Theocracy demanded by God. Students will become wary of churcheous (outward) appearance versus the manifestation of Godliness. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Igbo Language:

This course covers alphabets, words, names, and rudimentary numerals. Students will learn how to use these items to construct phrases and sentences as well as read and write texts in that language. Ambitious students will be able to pass the standard written and oral Igbo language administered by Alta Language Testing Board and by Emmanuel University Writing Center.

Research Methodologies:

This course covers the study of quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods in academic research. The different research designs as applicable or pertinent to each method will also be covered. Students will learn the principles of each methodology and use of each methodology to conduct an academic research activity.

Evangelization: Christianization/Islamization:

This course covers the modes, and moods, and acts of Christian and Muslim fanatics who pursue an enlargement of their religious worship paradigm. Students will become conscious of the signals of toxicity or safety in the midst of any fanatical propagator.  This course covers a multi-faceted comprehension of evangelism in the perspectives of Christians and Muslims with a view to revealing evangelization approaches. Students will become aware of the symptoms of religious propaganda in the two domains. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top quarter of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Applying Technology to Religion:

This course covers the specific use of computers and other high-technology apparatuses in the prosecution of religion. Students will learn who, where, when, how, and why specific individuals (corporate or otherwise) have applied technology to prosecute religion.

Islamization:

This course covers the act of entrenching the religion of Islam in a geographic area. Students will learn the agenda formula, the treaty formula, and the staccato formula in Islamization.

The Body: The Temple:

This course covers the body-spiritual and body-physical ramifications of the Biblical mandate God placed on humanity regarding preserving the body.  Elements of the course will include health and wellbeing, God’s prescriptions for human health, God’s creations and their health implications, and man’s destructive activities against the body, especially the heart. Students will become conversant with the connection between spiritual and biological aspects of the body. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top (fourth) quarter of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

OT and NT People:

This course covers an analysis of comparative and parallel personalities selected from the Old and New Testament. Students will identify and describe the similarities of the individuals as well as match them against individuals who are diametrically opposite in character.

Master’s

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Master of Ministry

 

The degree of Master of Ministry will involve 130 semester hours that can be broken down in quarters. Students will cover advanced levels of the courses in the Associate programs. Because the master program tends towards specialization, the courses will be configured along the intended specialization directions. Ministry is about the Christ of God. Therefore, this level of learning will be circumscribed by the understanding of ministry from the angle of individuals such as John the Baptist, Christ the Messiah, Paul of Tarsus, and the 12 Disciples. A holder of Master of Ministry must be versed in the angles of these (and other) ministry functionaries. Analogies of pre-advent, advent, post-advent will form critical components to achieving this degree. Furthermore, students will conduct analyses of post-modern ministry world. Students will conduct thorough considerations of the Testaments, human assumptions, Biblical facts, sermon elements, God’s laws, human laws, church laws, government laws, dogmas, etc.

 

Students must complete 70 credits over a period of 2 years. Specializations will depend on the core and elective courses selected from the course pool. Individuals will achieve credits allowing them to function in the different ministry arms such as pastoring, evangelism, counseling, local missions, worship, international missions.

 

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Master of Theology

 

A pursuit of the Master of Theology degree involves achieving 130 hours. The contents of the Holy Bible are central to the entire curriculum. A master of Theology can become a pastor or a resource person of critical importance in the delivery of God’s service in church, community, family, and professional circles. Hewbrew-American Studies constitute our flagship offering. Below is the general pool of Master’s degree courses. Graduates of this program will be strong in communicating, critical thinking, differentiating between spirituality and religiosity, reading and interpreting EXACTLY what the book says, recognizing the different between the word and Holy Spirit order.

Master’s Degree General Course Pool

Old Testament:

This course covers a treatment of the backgrounds of all the books of the old testament with a view to eliciting Bible-centered followership rather than discipleship based on the personal guidance of a speaker, apostle, prophet, evangelist, pastor, or teacher. Students will be able understand God through God’s dealings with people of old as an example of how modern humans may perceive their relationships with God of the old testament.

Anti-Semitism:

This course covers (a) the theory of the migration of Shem’s bloodline (b) the travails of Shem’s offspring, (c) the specific acts of violence and violation perpetrated on Shem’s bloodline, and (d) the pro-Shem activism and push-back on the hate actions against Shemites. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the second quarter of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Biblical Literature:

This course covers the language, poetic, literary, and historical domiciliation of Bible stories. Students will become versed in the usage and abusage contained in texts to show the idiosyncrasies, whims, and fancies of central characters in the specific scripts. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the bottom half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Igbo Language:

This course covers alphabets, words, names, and rudimentary numerals. Students will learn how to use these items to construct phrases and sentences as well as read and write texts in that language. Ambitious students will be able to pass the standard written and oral Igbo language administered by Alta Language Testing Board and by Emmanuel University Writing Center.

From Adam to Noah:

This course covers the genealogy from Adam to Noah with a view to identifying trending tenets in the first world. Students will be able to pick out persons and events of interest in the Adam-to-Noah frame to serve as a sequencing tool for comprehending the post-flood world. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top two quarters of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Creationism:

This course covers the belief in creation – the entire Chapters 1 and 2 of the book of Genesis. Discussion of contemporary presentations by diverse schools of thought. Students will learn to rely solely on ONLY what the Bible specifies, which is creationism.

Paul Versus Peter:

This course covers parallel paradigms of Paul of Tarsus and Simon Peter who both presented verbal testimonies that revealed dissent between them. Students will learn Pauline and Peterine elements of the New Testament and be able to identify those perspectives when preachers deliver their sermons.

Old Testament People:

This course covers outstanding personalities of the Old Testament, their lives and times as recorded from Genesis to Malachi. After taking the course, students will be able to recognize those names in oral or written presentations, and develop the propensity to theorize with those names.

Research Methodologies:

This course covers the quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods in academic research. The different research designs as applicable or pertinent to each method will also be covered. Students will be able to use each of the methods to conduct basic research.

International Missions:

This course covers the activities constituting international missions, focusing on (a) the challenges, (b) the problems, and (c) the prospects. Students should gather enough knowledge to plan, activate, organize, direct, and control an international missions activity. Ambitious students should be able to pass a certificate test administered through the collaboration of Emmanuel University and the International Institute for Africa Scholars, Ghana.

New Testament People:

This course covers outstanding personalities of the New Testament, their lives and times as recorded from Matthew to Revelation. After taking the course, students will be able to recognize those names in oral or written presentations, and develop the propensity to theorize with those names.

Hebrew-Americans:

This course covers (a) the Hebrewic content of the United State, (b) the difference between the Hebrew and the Jew, and (c) what people-grouping constitutes the ‘Hebrew-American’. Students will be able to objectively dissect religious affinities and the antecedent human content within the contiguous United States. Performance level in this course will be hinge on the second quarter of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Capstone:

This course covers a project that is a culmination of lessons learned from courses taken, internships, mentoring activities, and interactions among students as well as with faculty members. Students will submit a capstone paper in which they students demonstrate multi-disciplinary exposure in the manner of the fruit of the spirit (one fruit many tastes). Galatians 5:22-23 (22 But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, forbearance, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, 23 gentleness and self-control. Against such things there is no law.)

 

Paul Versus Christ:

This course covers parallel paradigms of Paul of Tarsus and Christ the Messiah to reveal topics Christ and Paul addressed with a view to identifying similarities and dissimilarities. Students will treat the issue of doctrinal superiority between Christ and Paul based perspectives manifesting in the respective presentations.

Modern Captivity:

This course covers the advanced conceptualization of captivity with applications. Examples of non-humans such as birds, animals, reptiles, and sea life will serve in this course. The conceptualization will form a basis for analyzing human captivity in the 21st Century. Students will be able to not only apply the concept of captivity to spirituality but also be able to create hypothetical scenarios to effectively communicate conceptual shackles to others.

New Testament:

This course covers a treatment of the backgrounds of all the books of the new testament with a view to exploring the thrust of the Gospels, the Acts, and the Epistles. Students will be able identify the effects of these texts on Judeo-Christian believers. Performance level will be gauged with the second and third quarters of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

The Great Man Theory:

This course covers the enunciation of the qualities of greatness in an individual that endears the individual to others around him, and using this principle to interpret the person of Jesus Christ in the context of leadership. Students will develop the morale to not only manifest their individual leadership styles, but to also dare to be ‘great’ in the sense of this theory. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the lower half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

The Law and the Prophets:

This course covers spiritual antecedents of the scriptures on the law portion of the Holy Bible and the prophets portion of the Holy Bible. Students will have a thorough understanding of the laws of God and who the major and minor prophets were. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the bottom half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

The Big Bang Theory:

This course covers the science-laden anti-creationist belief and the Christian perception of the ‘big bang’. Students will become thinkers who can hold meaningful topical conversation and match Christian belief in creationism against the diverse views on how man came to populate the planet earth. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the bottom half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Missionary Journey Analytics:

This course covers an analysis of all three missionary journeys of Paul of Tarsus. Each student will become a critical thinker, develop and demonstrate analytical mind, and identify incidents that stand out to him or her. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the bottom half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

The Apocalyptic Jurisprudence:

This course covers the pronounced (written) antecedents of the apocalypse in the Bible focusing on the four horsemen as well as diverse human scripts on the apocalypse. Students will be in no doubt as to the Biblical postulations.

Applicability of OT and NT Genealogy:

This course covers the sequencing (a) the genealogy of man from creation down to Noah’s children, (b) the genealogy of Christ, and (c) applying them to contemporary human generations. Students will learn where they fit as human generations and be able to convey the knowledge. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the bottom half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Membership Orientation Through Sermonology:

This course covers the use of sermons from the pulpit to ground audiences into becoming committed members of the church. Students will learn that kingdom-minded preachers have deemed short membership orientations insufficient to elicit long-term loyalty, and that the sermons meant for preaching salvation and eternal life are being used to win the hearts of attendees for the ‘kingdom’ belonging to pastors (on earth) rather than win the souls for the kingdom belonging to Christ (in eternity). Performance level in this course will be gauged with the bottom half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

From Egypt to Promised Land:

This course covers the journey of the children of Israel from Israel to the Promised Land. Students will learn spiritual, human, and technical details of the emigration.

Seven Churches of Revelation:

This course covers the churches Apostle John heard about when he was in the Island of Patmos. The content will include (a) actual locations of the churches, (b) timelines and events around the churches, and (c) what became of the churches. Students will become aware of the symptoms of success or failure among churches. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top half of Bloom’s Taxonomy. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the bottom half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Churchiology and Theology:

This course covers the comprehension and analysis of human churching antics visible in some churches versus the godliness of Theocracy demanded by God. Students will become wary of churcheous (outward) appearance versus the manifestation of Godliness. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the bottom half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

 

From Noah to Egypt Captivity:

This course covers a continuum of generations spanning the spiritual, physical, psychological, geographical, biological, social, cultural (a) story, comprehension, and spiritual ramifications of Noah’s Ark to (b) the life and times of Israelites while they were enslaved in Egypt.  Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Influence of the American Church:

This course covers the power American style evangelism exerts on Christians world over. Prominent names and churches in the United States will serve as examples of church journeys from 1776 AD to the present. Students will learn the similarities and dissimilarities in liturgy – American on the one hand, and other cultures on the other hand. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the bottom half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

The Body: The Temple:

This course covers human anatomy and physiology beyond simple knowledge of biology, and learn the exact ways in which the body is a temple of not only the Holy Spirit but also a structure that requires upkeep in line with the prescriptions of the Holy Bible. Students will relate the lessons learned to the resources God put in place “for the healing for the nations.” Performance level in this course will be gauged with the third quarter of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Biblical Customs and Traditions:
This course covers customs and traditions the people of God observed as documented between Genesis and Malachi. Students will learn the similarities and dissimilarities between customs of the Biblical times and the Common Era in modern societies. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the bottom half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

God’s Law Versus Man’s Law:

This course covers the laws God gave human beings vis a vis the laws human beings gave to themselves. Students will to draw line between what they (as human being) like versus what they (as human beings) are mandated to do.

Theology and Natural Sciences:

This course covers the Theology’s perception of natural sciences and natural science’s perceptions of Theology as religious texts and science texts reveal. Students will become aware of divergences that might exist and how to scripturally and spiritually manage those divergences. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the bottom half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Biblical Versus Human Verbiage:

This course covers common expressions that are popular in the Holy Bible and those manifesting in the secular human conversations. Students will become circumspect in the use of words within and outside sacred and secular environments and atmospheres. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the bottom half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Church Doctrines and Church Members:

This course covers the different dogmatic teachings churches foist on their members and the multiplicity of loyalty levels arising from the diversity. Students will learn how to decode and decipher factors and similitudes of dogma in a church.

Evangelization: Christianization/Islamization:

This course covers the modes, and moods, and acts of Christian and Muslim fanatics who pursue an enlargement of their religious worship paradigm. Students will become conscious of the signals of toxicity or safety in the midst of any fanatical propagator.  This course covers a multi-faceted comprehension of evangelism in the perspectives of Christians and Muslims with a view to revealing evangelization approaches. Students will become aware of the symptoms of religious propaganda in the two domains. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the third quarter of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Bachelor

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Bachelor of Ministry

 

The degree of Bachelor of Ministry has multiple elements. Service, Leadership, Organizing and Activating are major components of this educational path. A student should select courses from the different elements to arrive at 130 semester hours required as graduation credits. The student’s specific description after graduation will depend on the composition of the course selections. Therefore, every student will get help in choosing courses that take the student intends to go, unless the student already knows details of his or her direction, or the students has heard from God and must follow God’s strict direction in choosing the specific courses. The general pool of courses serves for Bachelor of Ministry and Bachelor of Theology students, hence, a student’s specific description after graduation is a reflection of the specific courses taken.

Bachelor of Theology

 

A bachelor degree in Theology will involve 130 semester hours that can also be broken down in quarters. The budding theologian is a person who is particular about God’s plan for everything. Such God’s plan is contained in the Holy Bible. The theologian wants to hear the voice of God in every sentence in the Holy Bible. A holder of the degree Bachelor of Theology is at the foundation level of working with the voice of God. The student will be educated to comprehend the Holy Bible, use the content to affect the lives of those around him or her, and manifest increasing desire to dig deeper. Hebrew-American studies constitute our flagship offering. A holder of the Bachelor of Theology degree already imbibed cohesion, critical thinking, and order in handling spiritual the antecedents pertaining to ministry. The general pool of courses serves for Bachelor of Ministry and Bachelor of Theology students; hence, a student’s specific description after graduation is a reflection of the specific courses taken.

Bachelor Degree General Course Pool

 

Anointing of God, by God, and from God:

This course covers the manifestations of God’s power in the performance of virtues among human beings, based on the Christ factor. Students will be able to express confidence in manifestations that appears to be God-centered versus human demonstrations.

Lydia’s House Church Paradigm:

This course covers the complete ramifications of the church at Lydia’s house (Acts 16:40) along with the ripple effects for Lydia’s era and up to the 21st . Students will use Lydia’s model to sequence modern-day house churches as well as determine the consistency of such churches in 21st century.

From Adam to Noah:

This course covers the genealogy from Adam to Noah with a view to identifying trending tenets in the first world. Students will be able to pick out persons and events of interest in the Adam-to-Noah frame to serve as a sequencing tool for comprehending the post-flood world. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the second lowest quarter of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

 

The Joseph Prison Experience:

This course covers the travails of Joseph in the Egyptian prison, the physical and spiritual import of the experience, and nuances of Joseph’s victory. Students will be able to apply lessons learned to their everyday lives as well as convey the lessons to other people.

Behind the Sermon Preaching:

This course covers the backstage of pulpit, whats, hows, and whys of sermon preparation as well as extrapolations from various preaching simulations. Students will become aware of pre-preaching expectations, on-stage moments, and post-preaching outcomes for preachers and listeners.

Biblical Investigative Inquiry:

This course covers intense research activity in which students follow the same process and methodology to delve into areas they are curious about. Each student must complete an articles publishable by appropriate media (adjudged appropriate by Emmanuel University Writing Center).

Egypt Captivity to Promised Land:

This course covers the period from the Pharaoh who does not know Joseph to the entry of Israelites into the geographic location labelled ‘Promised Land’. After taking this course, students should be able to be able to convey not only the story of the exodus but the ramifications of diverse aspects of the journey. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the top half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Gender Issues in God’s Service:

This course covers the place of women in ministry, Christ’s position on women in ministry, and the positions humans take on the issue of women in ministry. Students will explore and assimilate similarities and dissimilarities.

Collaborative Ministry Dynamics:

This course covers intra-organizational team dynamics, inter-organizational collaboration, leadership and followership in collaborative ministering. Students will identify their individual strengths in the context of collaborative ministry roles.

The Letter and the Spirit:

This course covers the written and unwritten essence of God. 2nd Corinthians 3:6. Students will learn the place of the letter and the place of the Spirit in growing and developing Godliness.

Land of Modern Captivity:

This course covers the geography of proverbially shackled human sojourn under the influence of jurisprudence, subtle social infusion, or systemic operationalization. Students will become aware of the nuances of societal operations that hold sojourners captive in specific geographic locations in the 21st Century.

Grounding and Firm Foundations:

This course covers the concept of grounding in physics to explain laying a firm foundation for human and material entities, which is an offshoot of spirituality. Students will learn the analogous similarity between physical electricity and spiritual electricity as foundations.

Human Versus God’s Celebrations:

This course covers (a) the feasts God commanded and ordained, and (b) the feasts human beings imposed on themselves. Students will streamline these feasts and logically justify or nullify some or all of them. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the bottom half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Christian Leadership Principles:

This course covers leadership styles and how the styles influence ministry activities with particular analysis of Christ’s style. Myers Briggs MBTI Personality Test will be used in this course. Students will test themselves with the styles to determine what their potential leadership styles could be.

 

Growing or Dying Church:

This course covers the symptoms of growth and stagnation of a church. A study of the living and dying of a church will be two-pronged: (a) physio-structural, and (b) psycho-spiritual. Students will become conscious of the antecedents that manifest in their churches and be able to tell if the church is living, dying, going to live, or going to die.

Spirituality of God’s Relationship:

This course covers the personal connectedness with the Almighty God. The spiritual expectations on self-disclosed followership of God and the actual relationship modalities. Students should be able to convey the tenets to others after taking the course.

 

The Blood, The Water, The Word:

This course covers the connection between the Blood, the Water and the Word in which instances the Blood refers to the Calvary incident; the water refers to the Calvary incident, and the Word refers also to the Calvary incident. Students will be able to understand the appearance of any of the three words in other secular or spiritual text and comprehend beyond the regular usage and abusage of the three words.

Theological Paradigms:

This course covers will cover the different domains human beings have created upon which the knowledge of God has been propagated. Students will be able to determine the difference between religious (human) and spiritual (God’s) paradigms.

The James 5:14 Mentality:

This course covers the power of this Bible verse and the possible reason the content could constitute the primary influence of a religious grouping. Students should be able to conduct an analysis of the pros and cons of this verse and potential effect on propagators and condemners of the content.

From Noah to Egypt Captivity:

This course covers a continuum of generations spanning the spiritual, physical, psychological, geographical, biological, social, cultural (a) story, comprehension, and spiritual ramifications of Noah’s Ark to (b) the life and times of Israelites while they were enslaved in Egypt.  Performance level in this course will be gauged with the two middle halves of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Contractual Access to God:

This course covers elements of right in accessing God. Human beings claiming to have the right to interact with God would need proof of their agreement with God. That contractual obligation must be clear, if it exists. Students will become aware of the extent to which human beings have access to God.

Biblical Ethics and Morality:

This course covers the theories of ethics and morality, and relies on biblical truths to convey the standards expected of ministers of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Students will not only become conscious of ethical and moral standards, be able to detect violations around them, and entrench biblical ethics and morality in the ministry or any organization in which they find themselves.

Knowing God:

This course covers the names of God and how humanity may make connections with those names. Students will be sure of what they worship and be bold in expressing their faith under all circumstances.

West African Hebrews:

This course covers the life, times, and timelines of Hebrew settlers on the West African Atlantic Coast. Students will develop a new curiosity that will lead to further explorations.

Music Principles and Practice:

This course covers the fundamentals of music theory with advanced knowledge levels practice of the E,G,B,D,F as well as F.A.C.E. staff notation models . After taking this course, students will be able to read and write simple songscripts in staff notation.

Igbo Language:

This course covers alphabets, words, names, and rudimentary numerals. Students will learn how to use these items to construct phrases and sentences as well as read and write texts in that language. Ambitious students will be able to pass the standard written and oral Igbo language administered by Alta Language Testing Board and by Emmanuel University Writing Center.

Anti-Semitism:

This course covers (a) the theory of the migration of Shem’s bloodline (b) the travails of Shem’s offspring, (c) the specific acts of violence and violation perpetrated on Shem’s bloodline, and (d) the pro-Shem activism and push-back on the hate actions against Shemites. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the first quarter of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Christian Stewardship:

This course covers the principles of accountability from the multiple perspectives of (a) keeping accounting records, and (b) using funds to execute God’s purposes, (c) holding the ministry (corporate) responsible for extending God’s arms to benefit humanity, and (d) holding individual ministry officials and servants accounting for every part of ministry funds they manage, and (e) ensuring ministry funds arising from general receipts from audiences do not inure to one individual. Students will enforce accountability among ministries, church leaders, and other managers of corporate religious organizations.

Christian Counseling:

This course covers the principles of counseling as enunciated in the Holy Bible, following specific admonishments of God, instructions of Christ, and human counseling endeavors. Students following this route can become Counselors.

Christian Sociology:

This course covers the human society in the first Christian era, how the society developed and functioned as well as how the Christian people structured their society. Students will be able to identify the difference between the first Christian society and the 21st century Christian society.

Healing of the Nations:

This course covers (a) God’s prescriptions for human health, especially using God’s creations to achieve good health, and (b) matching God’s prescriptions with healthcare man’s processes to achieve good health. Students will have requisite understanding of the roles of school textbook healthcare process and God’s prescriptions for the healing of the nations.

Knowing Jesus Christ:

This course covers the gamut of Christ-consciousness, Christ-nomination, and Christology. Students will become knowledgeable in the person and personality of Christ, especially based on the Book of Isaiah, the Synoptic Gospels, and Revelation.

Schooling Versus Educating:

This course covers the principles of education and the art and science of ‘schooling’, exposing ‘schooling’ as a verb (telling and doing). Students will know the difference between an educated and a schooled person.

Judaic Principles:

This course covers specific antecedents of Judaism in the worship of Yahweh. Students will be able to tell the difference between those who shun AD worship of God and BC worship of God as well as the arguments each group relies on.

Evangelization: Christianization/Islamization:

This course covers the modes, and moods, and acts of Christian and Muslim fanatics who pursue an enlargement of their religious worship paradigm. Students will become conscious of the signals of toxicity or safety in the midst of any fanatical propagator.  This course covers a multi-faceted comprehension of evangelism in the perspectives of Christians and Muslims with a view to revealing evangelization approaches. Students will become aware of the symptoms of religious propaganda in the two domains. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the second quarter of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

The Body: The Temple:

This course covers the body-spiritual and body-physical ramifications of the Biblical mandate God placed on humanity regarding preserving the body.  Elements of the course will include health and wellbeing, God’s prescriptions for human health, God’s creations and their health implications, and man’s destructive activities against the body, especially the heart. Students will become conversant with the connection between spiritual and biological aspects of the body. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the second quarter of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Associate

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Associate in Ministry

 

This Associate in Ministry degree involves 70 hours of programmatic study for opportunities in church as well as non-church Christian religious organizations. Hebrew-American studies constitute our flagship offering.  Students are to complete 40 credits in the major and 20 electives from which to achieve a minimum of 14.

Diverse certifications and licenses are available for students who desire such specific identification along the way. To pursue the Certificates, a student must earn 20 credits. Earning the certificates helps towards degree pursuits for those who want to take the journey in bits and pieces due to family, work, or other professional activities.

 

An Associate in Ministry can fit in any organized Christian activity, organization, event, or network. Such an Associate will shine like a star when engaging in any part of the activities due to the exposure this course program brings. An Associate in Ministry can also serve as an assistant pastor.

 

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Associate in Biblical Studies

This course program enables a student to delve into the Bible from both academic and spiritual angles. This exposure puts a student on the road to knowledge that combines Christian theory and practical spirituality. Hebrew-American studies constitute our flagship offering. Students are to complete 40 credits in the major and 20 electives from which to achieve a minimum of 14. As an Associate in Biblical Studies you are able to stand your ground when individuals quote the Bible out of context or try to manipulate the Truth of God’s Word. Consequently, the Associate in Biblical Studies can fit in any and every academic environment, grow as an academic, function as an academic, rise as an academic, and influence policy the handling of Biblical content among argumentators. Bible Studies fundamentals that are covered in this course program strengthen a believer beyond the academic and extend to the ability to influence the doubtful. An Associate in Biblical Studies should be able to match up the Word of God against traditions, cultures, global trends, generational attitudes and fads.

 

Students will conduct academic investigations.

Students will conduct spiritual investigations.

Students will conduct professional investigations.

Students will conduct ministerial investigations.

The investigations will involve the use of The Law, The History, The Prophets, The Gospels, The Epistles, Pre- and Post-Tribulation, and The Apocalypse.

By the end of this course program, the holder of an Associate in Biblical Studies can face any situation.

Associate Program – General Course Pool

 

Christianity and Theology:

This course covers (a) the tenets gleaned from Christ’s postulations in the Synoptic Gospels and (b) man’s systematic development of religious belief as conveyed in diverse texts, orthodox worshippers and Godians. Students will be able to demonstrate a cognitive grasp of the two paradigms.

 

Reading: Igbo and English:

The course covers the art of reading, knowledge of vocabulary, and fluency in Igbo and English languages. Ambitious students will be able to pass the standard written and oral Igbo language administered by Alta Language Testing Board as well as written and oral English language administered by Emmanuel University Writing Center.

 

Egypt Captivity to Promised Land:

This course covers the period from the Pharaoh who does not know Joseph to the entry of Israelites into the geographic location labelled ‘Promised Land’. After taking this course, students should be able to be able to convey not only the story of the exodus but the ramifications of diverse aspects of the journey. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the bottom half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

 

Christian Anthropology:

This course covers the historical study of Christian-influenced human societies and cultures as well as how those societies and cultures developed over time. Students will become knowledgeable in the social, physical, cultural, and biological elements of those historic Christian societies

 

West African Hebrews:

This course covers the emergence of the Hebrew bloodline on the West African Coast. Students will become evidentially aware of the people group as an elemental antecedent in Shemitism.

 

Abram to Joseph to Benjamin:
This course covers the ethnography that reveals Abram’s first encounter metamorphosing in the creation of a new people group up to the youngest child of Jacob. Students will be versed in the foundation of the pre-Israeli Abrahamism.

 

 

Prophecies/ Revelations/Divinations:

This course covers (a) the identifiable prophetic events/manifestations, (b) apparent human divinations, and (c) the inexplicable mysteries in the connection with Bible prophecies in Revelation, Daniel, and the portion of the Holy Bible described as “The Law”. Students will develop a knack for (a) testing the mysteries, (b) challenging human interpretations, and (c) monitoring events to find associations among events and prophecies, revelations, and divinations.

 

From Noah to Egypt Captivity:

This course covers a continuum of generations spanning the spiritual, physical, psychological, geographical, biological, social, cultural (a) story, comprehension, and spiritual ramifications of Noah’s Ark to (b) the life and times of Israelites while they were enslaved in Egypt.  Performance level in this course will be gauged with the bottom half of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

 

The Israel of Man:

This course covers the polity, geography, history, governance, and other paraphernalia of the Israeli country, time, and people. Students will be able to distinguish man’s mundane perspective of Israel from God’s establishment of a people group.

Mathematics:

This course covers basic junior college algebra and geometry. Students should be able to speak and write quantitatively even when presenting qualitative topics. Students should also be able to apply mathematical terms while conveying everyday communication.

Speaking:

This course covers the art of speaking giving due attention and consideration to communication nuances with the Transmitter-Receiver paradigm in mind. After taking this course, students should be able to (a) face audiences without shyness, (b) stay on topic, (c) carry the listeners along, and (d) earn, at least, one applause in the middle of a 30-minute speech.

Christian Logic:

This course covers the pros and cons of critical thinking strictly applied to the delivery of Christian thoughts. The diverse dogmas and denominational foci will constitute resources for pertinent criticisms in Christian logic. After taking this course, students should be able to juxtapose Christ’s logic on the dogmatic logic of different groups.                                                                                                                                                         

Adam to Noah:

This course covers the genealogy from Adam to Noah with a view to identifying trending tenets in the first world. Students will be able to pick out persons and events of interest in the Adam-to-Noah frame to serve as a sequencing tool for comprehending the post-flood world. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the lowest quarter of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Biblical History:

This course covers the historic elements and events that occurred prior, during, and after the era of the law (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy). This course is not about the Law. Students will understand the underlying atmospheres in which the events occurred.

Writing:

This course covers English Language writing skill based on simple to complex sentences. Students will be able to use written words to construct meaning and convey intended meaning in academic and professional environments.

Modern Captivity:

This course covers the conceptualization of captivity starting with non-humans such as birds, animals, reptiles, and sea life. The conceptualization will form a basis for analyzing human captivity in the 21st Century. Students will be able to apply the concept of captivity to spirituality and be able to communicate to others a good understanding of ‘BELONGING TO GOD IN THE MODERN ERA’.

Principles of Music:

This course covers the fundamentals of music theory with knowledge levels up to the use of E,G,B,D,F as well as F.A.C.E. staff notation models. After taking this course, students will be able to read and write simple songscripts in staff notation.

Biblical Geography:

This course covers lands and terrains mentioned in the Bible prior to, during, and after the period of the Law (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy). Students should be able to associate those lands with the modern-day names of those same places.

Interpretations:

This course covers the different meanings humanity has ascribed to the spiritual tenets in the word of God. Students will find out (a) what Christ said about word of God, (b) what Peter said about the word of God, and (c) what Paul said about the word of God.

The Israel of God:

This course covers the framework of God-instituted peoplehood of the Israeli nation. Students will be able to determine the connection between the Abramic (Abrahamic) ethnoreligious paradigm and modern day Abrahamism.

Hebrew-Americans:

This course covers (a) the Hebrewic content of the United State, (b) the difference between the Hebrew and the Jew, and (c) what people-grouping constitutes the ‘Hebrew-American’. Students will be able to objectively dissect religious affinities and the antecedent human content within the contiguous United States. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the lowest quarter of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Old Testament:

This course covers a treatment of the backgrounds of all the books of the old testament with a view to eliciting Bible-centered followership rather than discipleship based on the personal guidance of a speaker, apostle, prophet, evangelist, pastor, or teacher. Students will be able understand God through God’s dealings with people of old as an example of how modern humans may perceive their relationships with God of the old testament.

Igbo Language:

This course covers alphabets, words, names, and rudimentary numerals. Students will learn how to use these items to construct phrases and sentences as well as read and write texts in that language. Ambitious students will be able to pass the standard written and oral Igbo language administered by Alta Language Testing Board and by Emmanuel University Writing Center.

Computer Literacy:

This course covers the use of computers in communication, computation, and conceptualization. Students will use the computers in the classroom to demonstrate enough knowledge to use computers in the regular course of work.

New Testament:

This course covers a treatment of the backgrounds of all the books of the new testament with a view to exploring the thrust of the Gospels, the Acts, and the Epistles. Students will be able identify the effects of these texts on Judeo-Christian believers. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the first quarter of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Evangelization: Christianization/ Islamization:

This course covers a multi-faceted comprehension of evangelism in the perspectives of Christians and Muslims with a view to revealing evangelization approaches. Students will become aware of the symptoms of religious propaganda in the two domains. Performance level in this course will be gauged with the first quarter of Bloom’s Taxonomy.

The Body: The Temple:

This course covers human anatomy and physiology beyond simple knowledge of biology, and learn the exact ways in which the body is a temple of not only the Holy Spirit but also a structure that requires upkeep in line with the prescriptions of the Holy Bible. Students will relate the lessons learned to the resources God put in place “for the healing for the nations.”  Performance level in this course will be gauged with the lowest (first) quarter of Bloom’s Taxonomy.